Hotels in Caloundra, Australia

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Hotels in Caloundra

Caloundra offers a laid-back stay on the Sunshine Coast

The relaxed city of Caloundra is a beach resort on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, around one hundred kilometres north of Brisbane. The city consists of an array of beaches which are largely in an old fashioned Australian style and are somewhat more easy-going than other nearby cities. The city centre of Caloundra is home to a variety of shops, bars and restaurants ensuring that visitors to the area have everything they need to enjoy the beaches and weather. Several smaller beaches offer a family-friendly relaxing environment, plus there are some first-rate surfing opportunities to be found as well.

Two main beaches shaping the city

Although Caloundra houses many beaches along its coastline, Kings Beach and Bulcock Beach are the two main beaches of the city. Close to and in between these two beaches is where much of the commercial activity is situated and as a result the bulk of the hotels in Caloundra are also found here. Bulcock Beach is the prime option for families thanks to its peaceful blue waters, particularly at low tide. The area also features a picturesque boardwalk running along the coastline which is dotted with an assortment of cafes, bars and restaurants, all of which offer scenic views out to sea. Further east the coastline becomes Kings Beach which is more exposed to the ocean, as a result it offers better surfing opportunities than the neighbouring Bulcock Beach. The long stretch of sandy beach is again popular with families, plus many visitors taking advantage of the quick access from most of the central Caloundra hotels. An oceanfront saltwater swimming pool is located just back from the beach and offers a more relaxing swimming option for those less competent in the water.

Dining, drinking and shopping in Caloundra

Bulcock Street is the main street of Caloundra and runs behind its namesake beach. The street is lined with restaurants and shops and forms the heart of Caloundra’s economy. Visitors can find a wide array of cuisine on offer to suit any needs, from quick fast food outlets through to renowned gourmet restaurants. In recent years, this area of the city has received a great deal of investment and the ongoing revitalisation is making Bulcock Street increasingly desirable. Dozens of shops are also situated along the street providing visitors the chance to buy any everyday items needed, plus a range of local products and souvenirs. With regards to Caloundra nightlife, the majority of the bars are located between Bulcock Street and Bulcock Beach. A variety of establishments can be found to suit different clientele, with relaxed spots playing live music sitting next to upmarket cocktail bars or traditional Australian pubs showing live sports. In addition, several of the larger hotels Caloundra is home to, also have in-house bars and restaurants for extra convenience.

Alternative beaches away from the central two

Aside from the two central beaches, the region of Caloundra contains several other beaches close to the city centre. Next along the coast from Kings Beach is the less-frequented Shelly Beach, known for its rock pools and nearby parks. Shelly Beach faces directly east out to the Pacific Ocean and as a result is subject to strong ocean currents which leave it less suited to swimming and surfing. A more suitable option for swimming and surfing is Moffat Beach, a much quieter beach than the two central ones, lying further north of Shelly Beach. Protected by a small peninsula, the waters are calmer but still receive some sizeable waves. The area feels more localised but is also home to an assortment of smaller cafes and restaurants plus some independent hotel options in Caloundra, including caravan parks. Moffat also hosts one of Australia’s longest running surf competitions, the Pa and Ma Bendall Classic, which is held around April each year and sees a myriad of spectators and entrants come from across the region to be involved. Even further on from Moffat Beach is the quieter, family-friendly Dickie Beach which marks the northern edge of Caloundra.

Exploring beyond Caloundra

Many visitors to Caloundra also use the city as a base to explore more of the region, both along the coast and inland. Dozens of smaller beaches can be found heading north towards Sunshine Coast and also south towards Brisbane, often providing a much quieter and more remote atmosphere. In addition, there are also a variety of notable attractions inland from Caloundra. Australia Zoo is one of the most renowned animal centres in the entire country and is also famous for being owned by the late Steve Irwin and family. The zoo remains an extremely popular destination and is roughly just twenty-five kilometres inland from Caloundra, making a daytrip certainly feasible. The Glass House Mountains make for another desirable trip out of the city, lying around an hour's drive southwest. Formed of eleven peaks rising sharply from the surrounding flat landscape, they are an iconic sight amongst a series of serene forests and nature.

Price range

from ‎₹3,384to ‎₹27,975

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